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  • John 10:49 am on January 9, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: india, Khajuraho   

    The Erotic Temple Statues of India (Warning: Explicit) 

    The Khajuraho Group of Monuments in Khajuraho, a town in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, located in Chhatarpur District, about 620 kilometres (385 mi) southeast of New Delhi, is one of the most popular tourist destinations in India. Khajuraho has the largest group of medieval Hindu and Jain temples, famous for their erotic sculptures by chandale kings .

    The Khajuraho temples were built over a span of 200 years, from 950 to 1150 AD.

    Today, the temples serve as fine examples of Indian architectural styles that have gained popularity due to their explicit depiction of sexual life during medieval times.

    Further Reading:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khajuraho_Group_of_Monuments

     
    • Bonnie Brae 12:30 pm on January 9, 2013 Permalink | Reply

      Wow. Totally turned on here.

  • John 10:52 am on January 4, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: adam's bridge, india, sri lanka   

    Adam’s Bridge – May Have Once Joined India and Sri Lanka 

    Geological evidence indicates that this was at one point bridged by a land connection, and some temple records suggest that the connection was broken by violent storms in 1480.

    Satellite image

    Satellite image. One inch = 5 miles

    The bridge is 18 miles (30 km) long and separates the Gulf of Mannar (southwest) from the Palk Strait (northeast). Some of the sandbanks are dry and the sea in the area is very shallow, being only 3 ft to 30 ft (1 m to 10 m) deep in places, which hinders navigation. It was reportedly passable on foot up to the 15th century until storms deepened the channel: temple records seem to say that Rama’s Bridge was completely above sea level until it broke in a cyclone in 1480 CE.

    The bridge was first mentioned in the ancient Indian Sanskrit epic Ramayana of Valmiki. The name Rama’s Bridge or Rama Setu (Sanskritsetu: bridge) refers to the bridge built by the Vanara (ape men) army of Lord Rama in Hindu mythology, which he used to reach Lanka and rescue his wife Sita from theRakshasa king, Ravana. The Ramayana attributes the building of this bridge to Rama in verse 2-22-76, naming it as Setubandhanam, a name that persists until today.

    The sea separating India and Sri Lanka is called Sethusamudram meaning “Sea of the Bridge”. Maps prepared by a Dutch cartographer in 1747, available at the Tanjore Saraswathi Mahal Library show this area as Ramancoil, a colloquial form of the Tamil Raman Kovil (or Rama’s Temple). Another map of MughalIndia prepared by J. Rennel in 1788 retrieved from the same library called this area as “the area of the Rama Temple”, referring to the temple dedicated to Lord Rama at Rameswaram. Many other maps in Schwartzberg’s historical atlas and other sources such as travel texts by Marco Polo call this area by various names such as Sethubandha and Sethubandha Rameswaram.

    The western world first encountered it in “historical works in the 9th century” by Ibn Khordadbeh in his Book of Roads and Kingdoms (c. 850 CE), referring to it is Set Bandhai or “Bridge of the Sea”. Later, Alberuni described it. The earliest map that calls this area by the name Adam’s bridge was prepared by a British cartographer in 1804, probably referring to an Abrahamic legend, according to which Adam used the bridge to reach a mountain (identified with Adam’s Peak) in Sri Lanka, where he stood repentant on one foot for 1,000 years, leaving a large hollow mark resembling a footprint.

    Further Reading

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam’s_Bridge

     
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