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  • John 8:48 am on October 16, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: scott thorson   

    Tweet from JW WONDERLAND1981 (@jwwonderland123) 

    JW WONDERLAND1981 (@jwwonderland123) Tweeted:

    A witness whose claim cannot be and never was corroborated…is a gamble with juries. That is because jailbirds get the newspaper inside… and with all the time in the world..  how easily they do and will piece together an ass-saving false narrative to get a deal w the DA: https://t.co/UWBQ76nDFz https://twitter.com/jwwonderland123/status/1448436848309805056?s=20

     
  • John 4:09 pm on October 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , scott thorson   

    The Boy Toy’s Story, Part Two ;-) 

    W-land Blog Note: Scott made parole…

    Cont’d…

    Mr. Thorson later sued for $113 million in palimony, ultimately losing a highly public battle fought both in court and in the tabloids. He settled in 1986 for $95,000, according to reports at the time.

    There was a deathbed reconciliation before Liberace died of a disease caused by AIDS in 1987. And that is where the book version of “Behind the Candelabra” ends. But Mr. Thorson’s life went on, and as he explained in a series of interviews, both in person and via a jail-monitored version of Skype, many of the events that followed are as strange as the ones that came before.

    The trick is separating the strange from the unbelievable.

    “His approach to communicating with people is always to play it in a manner that reflects best on him,” said Oliver Mading, the man Mr. Thorson calls his adoptive father as well as his manager. On a recent evening, Mr. Mading was sitting in the living room of his home a few miles from Reno’s downtown. Sitting nearby was his stepson, Tony Pelicone, who met Mr. Thorson through a mutual friend a decade ago in Palm Springs, Calif.

    At best, these men sounded deeply ambivalent about being enmeshed in Mr. Thorson’s life.

    “He’s not a bad person,” said Mr. Pelicone, who has a swirl of brown-blond hair and a cigarette habit. “He’s just twisted and kind of cutthroat.”

    Mr. Mading: “He’d sell his mother — ”

    “Then he gives you that smile,” said Mr. Pelicone, interrupting

    The two admit that much of what they know about Mr. Thorson’s biography they learned from Mr. Thorson and that, at the very least, he has an aversion to telling his life story as a coherent, easy-to-follow chronology. During interviews at the Washoe County jail, Mr. Thorson was often evasive and moody, deflecting questions about his past to rage against the people who have declined to put up the $15,000 in bail he says he needs to get out of jail.

    “All these people are getting rich from my story,” he fumed, “and here I sit.”

    On Wednesday, he pleaded guilty, and asked to enter a rehabilitation program. He could face as little as probation with a suspended prison sentence to 2 to 30 years and combined fines of up to $110,000.

    What’s indisputable is that Scott Thorson is no longer named Scott Thorson. He is now known as Jess Marlow, a change Mr. Thorson says occurred when he entered the federal witness protection program as the star witness in the 1989 prosecution of an infamous Los Angeles character named Eddie Nash.

    Mr. Nash shows up in the book and movie as Mr. Y., described as a drug dealer with ties to organized crime who made headlines for allegedly ordering the so-called Wonderland murders, a grisly quadruple homicide that took place two days after Mr. Nash’s home was robbed of money and drugs in 1981. (The crime is named for 8763 Wonderland Avenue, where the killings took place.)

    Mr. Nash purportedly learned who had committed the robbery after his underlings beat up the porn star John Holmes, an acquaintance of Mr. Nash’s who later admitted to helping the robbers enter Mr. Nash’s home.

    A fictionalized version of these events turns up in “Boogie Nights,” with a Nash-inspired figure played by a Speedo-and robe-wearing Alfred Molina.

    Mr. Thorson says that Mr. Nash became a drug source for him in the early ’80s, and that he later became a partner in Mr. Nash’s club business. At some point, the two fell out and by 1988, Mr. Thorson was reportedly in a Los Angeles jail for an assortment of charges. There, he says, he was offered leniency by the district attorney’s office in exchange for testifying that he happened to be at Mr. Nash’s home when thugs pummeled John Holmes — which, if true, would make Mr. Thorson a kind of Zelig of the Awful. Eleven members of the jury voted to convict. One held out. Mr. Nash later admitted to bribing that lone juror, and in 2001, he struck a plea bargain in which he was sentenced to 37 months in prison for racketeering. Now, in his early 80s, Mr. Nash is a free man. And he would like to make it clear that he and Mr. Thorson were never partners.

    “No, no, he worked for me,” Mr. Nash said on the telephone. “When Liberace dumped him, he had nothing. He was on the streets. So I took him in and he worked at the house. He was good for cleaning. Because I lived with eight girls at the time. Beautiful girls. College girls. It was safe to have Mr. Thorson around, because he is gay. I had a gay cook, too.”

    Mr. Thorson claims that after the trial, marshals in the federal witness protection program moved him to Florida and gave him a new name. “They had to keep me safe because there was a contract placed on my life by Eddie Nash,” he said during one interview.

    “It started with the marshals taking me to different locations around the country for seven to 10 days, to make sure no one was following,” he said. “Texas, Alaska, Seattle.”

    It’s an intriguing narrative plot point — man forced to get a new face is later forced to take on a new identity. But the story sounds highly improbable to Bill Keefer, a former federal marshal in the witness protection program. He has doubts because of where Mr. Thorson eventually landed: at a Christian-based homeless shelter in Tallahassee, Fla., called the Haven of Rest.

    “How much protection could the marshals provide a guy at a homeless shelter?” Mr. Keefer asked.

    At the Haven of Rest, Mr. Thorson found religion. And instead of striving for invisibility, he shared his life story in front of church congregations. He says that he became a popular evangelizer, even appearing on a Pat Robertson TV show.

    “He would share his testimony about his life with Liberace,” said Danny Heaberlin, who ran Haven of Rest at the time. “We had pictures of him with Liberace, because the story was so out there, nobody would believe it otherwise.”

    Mr. Thorson says an East Coast mafia don gave him assurances that he needn’t worry about Mr. Nash. True or not, Mr. Thorson was unable to stay on the side of the angels for long. After three years at the Haven of Rest, he says, he started using drugs again, and in 1991, was shot three times in a room at a Howard Johnson’s hotel in Jacksonville. Local reports described the crime as a robbery committed by a crack dealer.

    “They thought he was going to die,” Mr. Heaberlin said, “but he kept living and living.”

    While he was recovering, a life-changing event occurred: a woman from Maine named Georgianna Morrill came to visit. Mr. Thorson would later claim she had seen him on TV, spreading the gospel, but that is not how Ms. Morrill remembers it.

    “I read ‘Behind the Candelabra,’ and I saw the photo on the back of the book and I heard the Lord tell me to pray for this guy,” she said, speaking from her apartment in South Portland, Me. “I thought, I don’t even know this man. But I’m a Christian and when God tells you to pray for someone, you do.”

    She found Mr. Thorson through a Pentecostal friend and soon after the two met, she invited him to live with her in a tiny two-story red house in Falmouth, Me.

    Mr. Thorson accepted. He stayed for the next 12 years.

    It was the second time that he found refuge in someone else’s life, but Falmouth was a long way from Vegas and Ms. Morrill was no Liberace. There were periods of domestic calm, with Mr. Thorson cleaning up around the house and collecting disability checks that he was eligible for after the shooting. But Ms. Morrill wanted to get married, despite all evidence that the match was a terrible idea. The couple had sex once, she recalls.

    “That was enough,” she said with a giggle.

    Mr. Thorson’s homosexuality wasn’t the only impediment. He drank a lot and when he did he would sometimes “get stupid,” in Ms. Morrill’s words, prompting her to call the police. Still, she held out hope that one day he would propose. And one day, he did, but with a ring with a pearl on top that she somehow knew he had purchased with a stolen credit card.

    W-LAND1981 Blog Note:

    The Reno Ponderosa where Scott was arrested, during happier times (man they really throw the book at ya for identity theft these days!)

     
    • John 6:42 pm on October 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply

    • JW 6:07 pm on October 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply

      ….admitted to bribing that lone juror, and in 2001, he struck a plea bargain in which he was sentenced to 37 months in prison for racketeering. Now, in his early 80s, Mr. Nash is a free man. And he would like to make it clear that he and Mr. Thorson were never partners.

      “No, no, he worked for me,” Mr. Nash said on the telephone. “When Liberace dumped him, he had nothing. He was on the streets. So I took him in and he worked at the house. He was good for cleaning. Because I lived with eight girls at the time. Beautiful girls. College girls. It was safe to have Mr. Thorson around, because he is gay. I had a gay cook, too”

      Like

  • John 12:15 pm on October 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , scott thorson,   

    The Boy Toy’s Story, Part One (2013 NYT Article) 

    It’s been 8 years already. Where does the time go? You know what they say, give em an inch of rope…

    BTW kids, if you are somewhat new to this amazing and heartbreaking story, I post things about Liberace and Scott Thorson because Scott chose to artificially paint himself into the story as a key witness, instead of serving ten years in San Quentin. Back then, he was doing violent home invasions in the late 80s with South Central gangbangers, and somehow earned those dudes’ respect. Many women were raped during these robberies as well. Scott says he wasn’t present for that cruel, vicious part though. Or, should I use his legal name? Jess Marlow.

    The Boy Toy’s Story, Part One

    By David Segal

    • May 10, 2013

    RENO, Nev. — Soon after moving into Liberace’s gaudy Las Vegas mansion in 1977, Scott Thorson, then a teenage hunk in the foster care system, learned that the jewel-smitten showman could love just as extravagantly as he decorated. Touring the premises before their relationship began, Liberace pointed out some decorative highlights, which included 17 pianos, a casino, a quarry’s worth of marble and a canopied bed with an ermine spread. On the ceiling was a reproduction of the Sistine Chapel with Liberace’s face painted among the cherubs.

    When the pair became a couple, Liberace, who was 40 years older, was just as excessive. He couldn’t bear to let Mr. Thorson out of his sight.

    “We were at a hotel in Florida and Liberace had the manager give us another suite, with windows that faced the beach,” said Mr. Thorson, now 54. “He knew I’d be near the water and he wanted to be able to look at me.”

    Liberace even wanted Mr. Thorson nearby when he worked. So for years, Mr. Thorson would don a chauffeur’s costume covered in rhinestones and drive “Mr. Showmanship” on stage in a bejeweled Rolls-Royce. Mr. Thorson would put the car in park, then open the door for Liberace, who would emerge in a fur coat with a 16-foot train.

    If you missed this routine, which ran for years at the Vegas Hilton, you can catch a re-enactment in an upcoming HBO movie, “Behind the Candelabra,” which is based on Mr. Thorson’s autobiography of the same name and stars Matt Damon as Mr. Thorson and Michael Douglas as Liberace.

    One person who may miss the movie’s debut, on May 26, is Scott Thorson. He currently is an inmate at the Washoe County jail here, and while the place has its share of amenities — including television — HBO isn’t one of them.

    Mr. Thorson has been held here since February, when he was charged with burglary and identity theft, after buying about $1,300 worth of computer and cellphone merchandise using a credit card and license that weren’t his. He was arrested at the Ponderosa Hotel, where he and a man he had just met rented a room for $33.90 a night.

    “We get a lot of the dregs of Reno, a lot of prostitutes, drug dealers,” said Eric Pyzel, a clerk at the Ponderosa who works next to a bumper sticker that reads “Welcome to Our Country. Just Do It Legally.” “The cops are by pretty often. So when they got here it was kind of like, O.K., what is it this time?”ImageMr. Thorson during a videophone interview at the Washoe County jail in Reno, Nev.Credit…Tina Fineberg for The New York Times

    On a recent Friday morning at the jail, Mr. Thorson was sitting in a small room of white cinder blocks, empty but for a sink and a wall-mounted dispenser of disinfectants. Two officers hovered. Not for the first time in his troubled life, he vowed to clean up.

    “This experience has scared me straight,” he said, in a slightly nasal tone that sounds vaguely like Liberace. “There comes a time when you’ve got to take responsibility. You’ve got to stop lying and face your mistakes.”

    It’s hard to connect this worn and anxious man in a blue prison shirt to the beefcake grinning in photographs in the late 1970s. Time, an on-and-off meth addiction, several stints in prison and what he describes as Stage 3 colon cancer have taken their toll.

    Another reason he looks different: the chin implant is gone. Mr. Thorson had it removed in an attempt to reverse one of the creepier episodes in the history of plastic surgery. Early in their relationship, Liberace plucked an oil painting of himself from a room in his Las Vegas mansion and asked a visiting doctor to reshape Mr. Thorson’s face to look like Liberace’s as a young man.

    Liberace wanted a boy toy and a son. With sex and fatherhood disturbingly twined, Mr. Thorson wound up with a new chin, a nose job and enhanced cheekbones.

    “I was 17 years old,” he said, explaining why he went along with a plan that sounds so lunatic. “Liberace had taken me out of a situation with a father who was very abusive, a mother who was mentally ill. I did everything I possibly could to please this man.”

    The two went on shopping sprees, traveled first class and spent a lot of quality time with Liberace’s Shar-Peis. Mr. Thorson was showered with gifts, including mink coats, an assortment of baubles and a Camaro. They entertained celebrities like Debbie Reynolds and Michael Jackson.

    But it all ended abruptly in 1982. That year, Liberace had members of his retinue forcibly eject Mr. Thorson from his penthouse in Los Angeles. It was a breakup caused, in part, by Mr. Thorson’s drug habit, which he says he developed trying to slim down, at Liberace’s urging, on what was called the “Hollywood diet,” a cocktail of doctor-prescribed drugs that included pharmaceutical cocaine.

     
  • John 1:34 pm on October 10, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , scott thorson   

    The Obituary for Jack Startz 

    Re: Lee and Thorson’s plastic surgeon

    Despite Rob Lowe’s horrible research and portrayal, Startz was a sexy and debonair man. Today, we honor his passing…

     
  • John 11:19 am on September 26, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , scott thorson   

    Jack Startz, Public Speaker 

    Thorson’s plastic surgeon was probably a big hit with the ladies back in ’73. Sorry real estate people, but this is funny. I never imagined that phrase in print.

    BTW, this is the same Cockatoo Inn bar used in the film, Jackie Brown. Tarantino’s best movie. Gone but not forgotten here at Wonderland1981.

     
  • John 3:25 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , michael connelly, scott thorson   

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/a-prison-interview-with-scott-thorson-wonderland-murders-witness-and-liberaces-pet

    Here we go, folks…. I’ve checked the podcast, it’s cool. Scott needs a gofundme LOL (No!)

     
  • John 11:12 am on January 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , scott thorson   

    Scott Thorson's House In Vegas 

    In the late 70s, Thorson purchased this home with some of his money as an investment, because Lee (Liberace) wanted Scott to have a nest egg of his own. Lee kept him on salary, like his other employees, minstrels and relatives. All of his expenses were paid for, so he had put the money away in the bank. And the movie had it right: It was hard to get cash outright from the entertainer, but Liberace thought nothing of giving someone a $10,000 piece of jewelry as a gift. By this time, the “tract house”, as Scott refers to it in his book, was already over fifteen years old (built in 1963). He doesn’t say how much he paid, but the price today looks quite unreasonable as one could have a custom home built someplace back east for this six-figure amount. BTW, Gladys Luckie was Liberace’s longtime and beloved housekeeper. After Thorson signed away everything for $75,000, Liberace got ownership of the house.

    Here is the home’s partial ownership history, from Clark County, NV records. These days, it’s a rental house:

    Previous Sales

    Date Owner
    12/26/2007 LUCKIE GLADYS
    05/22/2006 CHRISTMAS CHRISTOPHER & SHAWISHI
    05/22/2006 CHRISTMAS SHAWISHI LUCKIE
    04/14/2003 LUCKIE LINDA JOYCE TRUST
    07/11/2002 LUCKIE LINDA J
    05/23/2002 LUCKIE LINDA JOYCE
    02/27/1998 LUCKIE GLADYS TRUST ETAL
    08/21/1992 LUCKIE GLADYS & LINDA JOYCE
    05/18/1992 LUCKIE LINDA JOYCE ETAL
    06/08/1987 LUCKIE GLADYS
    02/18/1987 LIBERACE REVOCABLE TRUST
    05/05/1982 LIBERACE
    12/28/1978 THORSON SCOTT A

    Same Vegas address as given in the book, Behind The Candelabra (1988) – on Laramore Drive:

     

     
    • jimmy chicago 1:04 pm on January 23, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Thats how the liberals get around living next door to the people they want everyone else too.The shit they dont want in their neighborhood goes to yours. The prices and rules to live in these excluive areas are obscene.When they tore down Cabrini Green in Chicago and put up a few ‘afforadable” places or units mixed in they also held the people who needed the aid to a higher standard then the people who could afford to live there such as {drug testing] Like nun of the rich yuppies do drugs ,well they do but wont be tested like their misfortunate neighbors also they wernt allowed to have visitors like the others who could afford it.

      Like

      • criticextraordinaire 5:57 pm on January 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply

        Cabrini Green was not all that bad. Me and some buddies used to party over there in the early 1990’s. As to the drug testing… hey, if people want to live in housing subsidized by taxpayers, they damn well better not be spending their money on dope. If they got money for dope, then they don’t need my help paying the rent.

        Like

  • John 4:19 pm on August 11, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , scott thorson   

    True Lies: John Holmes and Scott Thorson 

    Addiction is a medical problem; a brain disease and is lifelong. So says the famous celebrity addiction counselor, Dr. Drew Pinsky. He goes further: “Once the switch to addiction is thrown, then it is a chronic, lifelong condition … addicts tell me that while they are sober, their addiction is doing push-ups, waiting to re-emerge and take over … it’s a brain disorder and it’s waiting and lurking in them.” Dr. Drew also says that when an addict begins to offer you a promise or an explanation, then you should cover your ears because you are about to receive a big load of bullshit.

    John Holmes and Scott Thorson

    So then – what can we say about these two men? Apparently, there is quite a bit because they really had a lot in common.

    Both men were originally from very humble beginnings in the Midwest – John from Ohio and Scott by way of Wisconsin and Minnesota. The pair each lived and worked on the edge of true celebrity and on the fringes of the entertainment world; enough celebrity fire to at least capture the friendship of Eddie Nash. Yet both became immersed in the hardcore world of drugs. Both men shared a love lust for the same drug – freebase rock cocaine – Crack!

    These two men have both had movies made about them, and both have become, by their own actions and mistakes – legendary figures. Both have ghost-written books, with Scott’s coming out the same year John died. Almost star-crossed, they have so much in common that it is almost like they were separated at birth, moved away and then as adults, veered towards the same destiny. The most common trait between these two men however, were the lies. It was that you could not believe a thing that came out of their mouths. They have also lied to themselves, and betrayed their own emotions.

    IMG_0275

    I should be delivering furniture in Ohio

    Everybody lies to get something they want on occasion, but according to the annals of psychiatry, “a pathological liar may be aware they are lying, or may believe they are telling the truth, being unaware that they are relating fantasies”. One origin of this behavior begins with a chaotic home life and generally starts to grow during a person’s teenage years. At this stage, due to insecurities, they begin to lie to cast themselves in a favorable light, as to “decorate their own person”. That says it all right there. Furthermore, the liar does not really believe the lies, and knows which are true if pressed for the truth, but, in cases of rather extreme traumatic events and to save conscience, the liar can easily “lie it away” quite quickly, in other words even lie to themselves to get it off their mental table or conscience – and bury it away as truth.

    The morning of the murders, when John was asked by his estranged wife, Sharon, how he could have been involved in something like that since the victims were his friends, he simply replied “they were dirt.”

    Decorate Their Own Person

    Like any book, writing your autobiography can be quite a difficult task. It is even harder to pen your life story though when you cannot keep your lies straight within the book itself and most damaging, keep the lies straight with things that you say on record that are to the contrary, before and after the book has been published.

    In the Wonderland realm, there have been three key figures who have accomplished this amazing feat: John Holmes, Scott Thorson and Dawn Schiller. Leaving Dawn out of this (for now), Holmes and Thorson could not even keep their lies straight even when it came time to capture, for the entire world to see, their own life story. They had already told different stories before the books were printed, and most damaging, Scott did it afterward as well.

    A person’s autobiography is the holiest of holies when it comes to your legacy, even if you do not have an exciting story to tell. These men did have great stories to tell, but they could not keep the lies from changing long enough to even let themselves die first. When you scan the online reader reviews for these books, even the average person has noticed it, and almost all of them mention it.

    Old things, dead and buried, often get new life breathed into them. Books are no different and due to the success of the 2013 film based on the 1988 book of the same name, Behind the Candelabra has gained some brief popularity and was re-released in electronic form with a few minor additions.

    Thus, I found Scott’s new Afterword. Yes, Scott (aka Jess Marlow) had an opportunity to add an Afterword section to the end of his famous book and he tells us what he has been doing lately. But what does he do with this opportunity? He lies. Scott stretches this short couple of paragraphs so that he can squeeze a lie in there. And here it is (paraphrased): As a person in witness protection because he was a witness against feared L.A. nightclub owner Eddie Nash, an attempt was made on his life by associates of Eddie Nash about a year after the trial. The only problem was, Nash’s first trial was a hung jury, and the second trial ended in acquittal. Nash was acquitted due to Scott’s flimsy testimony, not convicted. It would make no sense to kill him, at all. Unbelievable, yet sadly rather believable if you know Scott’s history of lying. By the way, Scott is trying to put together another book or movie about himself and is looking for investors with this project.

    Indeed, an attempt was made on Jess Marlow’s life, sure. It was at a cheap motel in Jacksonville in November, 1991. That did happen. However, the would-be assassin at the room that night was no pro, but simply a longtime petty thief and crack-head, a twenty-five year old man named Melvin Jerome Owen. He was arrested shortly after the shooting.

    According to police, they may have been smoking crack together in the room before the shooting, due to all of the paraphernalia lying about. The one good thing to come from the shooting though for Scott was that his own body and heart did not betray him. Although shot 3 times in the chest and after spending many weeks on the critical list, the authorities would later say “..it was very serious, nobody thought he would make it. But he just kept living and living and he finally recovered”. In his Afterword, Scott even raises the number of bullets that were pumped into his body by the assassin from three… to five. He lied again, yet he cheated death. After this, he moved in with a nice lady in Maine for about ten years. He lived clean, but later said that that felt like he was living a lie, so he went back to being a shit head.

    In his own book, Porn King, John Holmes tells a great story. But that is just it, a story. It was public knowledge via court testimony and news articles that John’s whereabouts on the night of the Wonderland murders was inside the house, with the killers. He was made to watch what they did to his friends. His attorneys admitted this much in court. Holmes admitted this to cops as well, albeit “off the record”. But when his long awaited book was published posthumously, the story had changed again. This time, he was not at the house, but kept at gunpoint at another house while his friends were brutally killed. He states that when they released him, he did go back to the Wonderland house, acting bravely, to check on them – only to discover the carnage that awaited him – “Their heads had been pulverized” and other such nonsense. Sharon Holmes statements about certain events even show that he couldn’t even keep his employment history straight – not remembering that his term as ambulance driver was “while” they were married, and not before they hooked up.

    John feared for the members of his family. All of this had been his fault and he knew it. This lie – even though it subverted justice and harmed many other people, does have a hint of real purpose behind it. In his eyes, it saved the lives of his family from the revenge of Eddie Nash. He could have come clean in his posthumous book, but there we are again, with his family exposed to danger. Even a liar loves his mother.

    For love or lust, there is nothing wrong with being emotionally or physically involved in a homosexual relationship. Next to Adam and Eve, it may even be the oldest hook-up known to mankind. Gay sex. The ancients were famous for it. But if you do it merely and solely for financial gain, then like any hetero tryst for hire, society has a word for that:  whore. Whether gay or bisexual or not at all, both John and Scott explored homosexuality in a grand public fashion, yet in a false way; because it was for their own individual financial gain. John did it in a video. Scott did it as Liberace’s always present boy-toy. And Scott told Larry King he was not gay.

    Neither man was gay or bisexual. John hinted at it, but only did one film and maybe a few old loops. Scott says he was solely with Liberace. But both men compromised their sexuality and emotions just for money and drugs. Scott did it on the long term, while John on the short, and both of their little escapades would end up in death and disaster, physically and legally.

    After John Holmes’ murder trial in 1982 and not too long after he had just been freed from jail, a morally and financially bankrupt Holmes starred in one gay porn film (The Private Pleasures of John C. Holmes) and in it, he had unprotected sex with a man named Joey Yale. Joey died of AIDS a few years later. AIDS was pretty much an unknown then, besides this was just for some quick cash.

    When Scott lied to Tom Lange and authorities about being at Nash’s house the night Holmes was brought in by the collar, it was to save his ass from going to jail for up to ten years from an aggravated assault and burglary during a home invasion. That’s three home invasions in this story so far, four if you count the robbery of the man in the Valley by Lind, Billy and Ronnie pre-Nash. That’s the one where Ronnie wanted to kill the maid, but Dave and Billy would not allow it.

    Alright, I’ll get off my soapbox.

     
    • bobabooie 12:22 pm on June 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Victims Miller, Launius et al, were “dirt”? Well at least THAT was no lie. At least “Johnny Wadd” wasn’t delusional.

      Like

    • criticextraordinaire 6:22 pm on August 17, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      John C. Holmes was not on the edge of celebrity. He was a huge celebrity in the 1970’s. I remember the local newspaper running full page ads, pitching the latest Johnny Wadd film. “Come see the Johnny Wadd Film Festival… free coffee and donuts at dawn!” ran one ad.

      Can you imagine any porn star today getting that sort of coverage? Bob Vosse was right… Johnny Wadd was the Elvis Presley of his day.

      As for John’s performance in “Private Pleasures” it was certainly a mercenary act. Anything for a buck and Johnny “Cash” Holmes was up for working that equation. Well, not really “up” for that until they brought in Sharon Kane as a stunt butt. You could clearly see that John’s mind was not into the performance, he was probably thinking about how he was going to rotate the tires on Amerson’s car while he was doing the action scenes for this flick.

      I don’t see John as having “exploited homosexuality” as much as I see him simply doing a film with a simulated homosexual act (albeit with Ms. Kane) for a buck. Heck he would have corn holed a rhesus monkey if they had paid him; to him it was simply getting a paycheck by impaling anything that was even remotely available. Thorson, on the other hand, seems to link every thing that happens to him as somehow related to his gayness.

      Like

    • Jill Nelson 8:32 am on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      Great read, John. I can’t disagree with anything you’ve put forth except to concur that memoirs (and particularly memoirs penned or ghost-penned by the famous and infamous) are easy to pick apart for holes if you have familiarity to, or even an inkling of the (real) story. Mostly, I agree with your comments as well, localarts. The only thing I would like to add is my belief that despite genetics playing a major role in forming our characters, our characters are also largely subject to and shaped by our home environments. And yes, our characters are definitely what defines us. From the get go, Holmes, and most likely Thorson as well, was groomed to survive at all costs. This is evident throughout John’s life beginning when he was a child, and in that regard, only the surface has been scratched.
      As I’ve maintained for many years, excuse making and comprehension are perhaps different sides of the same coin. Lies, deception and hustle are necessary tools to perpetuate the con game to the point where truth becomes fiction. Self-loathing factors in big time.
      Thanks. I enjoy popping in whenever I get a chance. 🙂

      Like

    • localarts 9:28 am on August 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply

      When you are so full of shit that you don’t even know who you are and you’re life is built on a pack of lies, the result is an endless stream of contradictions. That would be the case with Holmes. Many of his fans blame his behavior and shortcomings on drug addiction and to a degree, that’s true. What defined John Holmes as a man is the same thing that defines all of us… that is our character. And in that department he was sorley lacking. Big time!

      Like

  • John 3:36 am on January 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , scott thorson   

    Thorson Steals New Identity From Old LA News Anchor 

    Unbelievable. There are no words really. The real Jess Marlow died in 2014. The other one sits in a Nevada prison. My new alias in witness protection will be Ted Koppel, I need to work on my hair though.

    And it's true because Brian Williams was there that night.

    And it’s true because Brian Williams was there that night.

    Former Los Angeles news anchor, Jess Marlow, died on Sunday, August, 3, 2014. He worked at KNBC and KCBS in Los Angeles and was on the air for a combined 37 years. He was 84.

    I tried to stay away but I couldn’t.

     

     
  • John 7:23 am on February 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , scott thorson   

    Thorson’s “Afterword” In New Candelabra Edition Full Of Crap 

    So much revisionist history that it will make your head spin. Typical Thorson.

    I guess that with the success of the film, Behind The Candelabra, the book by Scott has been given a new printing. Thus, we have an Afterword added by Scott Thorson. It is no surprise to you, but he is so full of it.

    First of all, he observes all of the same old tired yet crooked “facts” about Wonderland and Nash. Scott also claims that the crackhead who shot him at the motel in Jacksonville was a hitman sent by Nash. Here is a link to an article regarding that incident. Melvin Jerome Owen was a career petty criminal and crackhead. He was just an addict who had been either partying with Thorson or knew he had drugs and attempted to rob him. Thorson may have been more slippery and teflon than Nash or Holmes in the past, but not anymore — since Scott is headed to prison.

    Nash was acquitted, not convicted due to Scott’s testimony. Ridiculous!

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    • Mark C 2:51 pm on February 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      Appears Holmes wish has can true, Not part of him after his death ended up in a Pickle Jar somewhere on the wall of a Bar or Nightclub. Or its sure not shown up anywhere yet I know of.

      Like

    • Mike 9:00 pm on February 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      “What’s up Holmes” in that context is short for “homeboy”. I guess in theory it should be “homes”.

      Like

    • Mark C 8:43 am on February 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply

      I don’t know if it just me or I think Scott or Jess what ever he going by now. I think he wants us to rate him on the John Holmes stretch the truth meter. Well that don’t sound too good but I think you know what I mean. I try put this nice as I can. Trouble with John Holmes name there a lot of jokes still out about him. Even in these days & times Holmes still pretty famous.

      Like

      • John 9:44 am on February 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, the surname Holmes is legendary now days. Before JH, did people go around saying “Hey, what’s up Holmes!” and stuff like that. He really did cement that name in history. One cannot see a person with that last name and not think of the guy. It’s pretty bizarre.

        Like

        • criticextraordinaire 8:44 pm on February 20, 2014 Permalink

          Well it’s good to see Johnny get his due. It’s shame that he got involved with drugs though. If he had dodged that bullet he’d still be at the top of the adult film world and would be worth a bloody fortune, distributing product from his own website, johnnywadd.com , as well as streaming video, merchandising, and the occasional *ahem” personal services. Not to mention the income stream provided by the information in that gold-encrusted foot locker.

          Like

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